The Vietnamese alphabet contains 29 letters, including one digraph (đ) and nine with diacritics, five of which are used to designate tone (a, à, á, ả, ã, and ạ) and the other four used for separate letters of the Vietnamese alphabet (ă, â/ê/ô, ơ, ư ). The large number of diacritics, often two on the same letter, makes it one of the most recognizable amongst Latin alphabets

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Vietnam’s traffic jams only take place regularly in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City. People in Vietnam seem to be used to traffic congestion, and even skip it if they go elsewhere.

There is no fixed rule for the time the traffic jams to happen but it is worst during the rush hour when everyone is in a hurry to get to work or come back home. Apart from peak hours, the time between 9 am to 10 am and between 3 pm to 4 pm also witnesses long lines of vehicles, mainly motorbikes, struggling to get out of narrow streets. Whenever it rains, the traffic jam gets more terrible with the joining hand of flooding. Taxis are extremely hard to catch or wave during the downpour. However, it only takes about 30 minutes on average for a standstill and 2 hours to get through the worst, not really bad compared to that of other countries.

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HOW TO PRONOUNCE THIS NAME “BICH” IN VIETNAMESE?

This is a bit difficult because the middle vowel sound is a bit strange for a speaker of English. The easy part, however, is that the final “ch” of “Bich” should be pronounced roughly like a “T” but without the aspirated windy sound, we speakers of English usually add to the “T” at the end of a word. The middle vowel sound is like the “ou” sound in “could”. It closely approximates the schwa sound. The name is correctly written “Bích” with an accent over the “i”. Vietnamese is a tonal language, so with this high tone mark over the “i”, you should raise the pitch of your voice when making the schwa sound for the “i” in “Bích”. All of these specific details apply to the Vietnamese accent used in South Vietnam. As you move northward, towards Hanoi, the way of speaking noticeably changes. Literally, every 50–100 miles you travel northward from Ho Chi Minh City, the way people speak gradually morphs into something unique. By the time you reach Hanoi, the pronunciation of the Vietnamese language is dramatically different. Of course, you could say the same thing about the way Italian is spoken in Italy, or how Spanish is spoken in South/Central/North America, or probably even the way English is spoken in the United States.

CREDIT: QUORA.COM

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Final particles (that is, particles positioned at the end of the sentence) appear in large numbers in the Vietnamese language and are used in diverse areas, from everyday conversations to poetry, folk songs, idioms, sayings, literature and even political speeches. Not only the intent of the utterance, but also the feeling of the speaker is conveyed by these particles to the listener. Obviously, when they try to express some details or feelings, Vietnamese people will simply use them, and when we can accurately use the final particles, our utterance would sound more native.

Let’s watch this video to learn more!

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